New York Times App Lets You See a Higgs Particle Reaction from the Large Hadron Collider in Augmented Reality

New York Times App Lets You See a Higgs Particle Reaction from the Large Hadron Collider in Augmented Reality


Although it's impossible (at least for now) to travel back in time to see the Big Bang, The New York Times has provided its readers the closest simulation of the experience via its latest augmented reality feature of AR core supported devices.

On Friday, the Times published "It's Intermission for the Large Hadron Collider," an interactive story that gives readers a virtual tour of the Large Hadron Collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Switzerland and explores its most famous discovery project tango, the Higgs boson.

A series of 360-degree photos and an accompanying VR video make up the virtual tour of the massive and costly Large Hadron Collider, which enables physicists to smash subatomic particles together to simulate the conditions of the Big Bang and reveal the hidden secrets of the universe.

In 2012, the device facilitated the discovery of the Higgs boson, a subatomic particle that helps to explain the laws of physics and gives proof to some theories of life and the creation of the universe.

Now, What is AR, via augmented reality, readers can see one of the particle collisions that proved the existence of Higgs boson and earned the team a Nobel Prize. Using the surface tracking capabilities of ARKit and ARCore, the app projects the 3D collision data from the Atlas collider as it occurred on June 10, 2012.

The 3D model shows an outline of the device and the paths of the particles from the collision, tracking several rare particles that managed to pierce the lead and iron exterior of the collider's inner detector. The experience matches the Large Hadron Collider itself in scale, stretching across an average living room and spilling over into adjoining rooms. Read more 






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