Privacy lawsuit over facial recognition in Google Photos dismissed by federal judge

Privacy lawsuit over facial recognition in Google Photos dismissed by federal judge


From face recognition to fingerprints, biometric data is widely used in today’s consumer technology to sort through pictures, unlock phones, google photos backup and more. Some states have passed privacy laws to govern usage, with the Biometric Information Privacy Act (BIPA) in Illinois allowing individuals to seek damages. A lawsuit involving Google Photos was just dismissed in a win for the company.

Rivera v. Google, Inc. dates back to 2016 and involves two individuals alleging that Google Photos made biometric scans of them without explicit permission as required by the 2008 Illinois law.

The first case involves a separate individual using a “Google Droid device” to take pictures of the plaintiff that were then upload photo to google. Presumably, the account where the pictures resided had the “Group similar faces” feature enabled.

Meanwhile, the second plaintiff took pictures of himself on a device and Google Photos account that he owned and managed.

Both argue that Google did not seek their permission to create or use the “face-templates,” nor did the plaintiffs grant the company “permission to collect or store the data derived from their faces.”

Google Cloud vision earlier this month noted how it won’t sell facial recognition tech to third-parties as the company works through policy and privacy questions. In contrast to Amazon and Microsoft, Google touted this deliberate pause as a result of its AI Principles being applied. Read more 






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